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Interview with Donavon Frankenreiter

In Uncategorized on September 5, 2011 at 11:30 pm
Donavon Frankenreiter Pedal Board

Donavon Frankenreiter Pedal Board

The Rigs: What guitarists’ sound influences you the most, both past and present, both acoustic and electric?  Feel free to name numerous players.

Donavon Frankenreiter:  I guess overall it would be Dylan, Hendrix, Clapton, Jimmy Page, Mark Ford, he was in the Black Crowes, Dan Auerback from the Black Keys, Craig Ross who is Lenny Kravitz Guitar player, Warren Haynes….

The Rigs: What musicians’ setups (guitar, pedals and amp setup) would you like to know about?

DF:  If I could go back in time and go to Jimi Hendrix sound check and play thru his stuff that would be ideal.  To see what volumes he played at and get the vibe of his sound

TR:  Two part Question: What is the direct of your sound as a band at present where does your sounds as a guitarist fit into that.

DF: Well I’m a Hendrix fanatic, I have a Custom Fender ’68 remake. I had it made custom by fender.  It’s a left- handed guitar strung righty.

TR:  So you have the low E on top?

DF:  yea, it’s a mirror image of what Hendrix played at Woodstock…and with the band I use a Fender Super Sonic.

For shows…I mainly go with the electric… I don’t pick up the acoustic sometimes (during shows)…I have a 62 Martin Triple L…sometimes I don’t use the acoustic that much it all, it depends.

I don’t have too much in my wedges except vocals and acoustic so I like to keep simple.

Those two guitars are my workhorse guitars.  I never change my strings unless they break.

I have a bunch of guitars at home and in my restaurant in Laguna from the 1940’s to the 2000’s

As far as pedals I have an old Ibanez tube screamer and if I want to push it up to another level I can hit the Animal on….I really only use the wah for beginning and ends of songs or just bits and pieces

TR:   I noticed you have one output from your acoustic that goes to two lines, does that combined the bridge pickup and the LR Baggs pickup you have in the sound whole? Is it a Fishman in the bridge pick up?

DF: Yea, Fishman in the bridge. Yea, it’s a stereo out so the John my front of house can get the vibe and true tone of the acoustic.

TR: Where do you see your sound going in the future as a guitarist or do you not think about that and just let it happen on it own

DF:    Well In a perfect world, if I were better with my guitar volume, I would just use a guitar, plugged strait into an amp.  I think that’s what Derek trucks does that and he is in so good controlling his volumes.  I like to just keep it simple with a guitar going strait into an amp with a great tone.

But, ya know, I don’t write with the electric.  Acoustics is how I write songs so….

TR: What is the lineage of your guitar sound? In other words, when you started playing guitar, who did your sound most resemble and how did that sound evolve to your guitar setup today?

DF:  I really liked Clapton’s and (Mike Cambell’s) sound.  I don’t know, maybe I could be wrong but it always seemed like they didn’t have a lot of pedals just a great sound.

I like a warm great tone, a good guitar with a true tone

I never used to have a pedal board before, my tour Manager (John Hagler) said man we got to get you a pedal board.  I just used to throw whatever pedals I had up there and, you know, go for it. …. I just used to buy 9 volts like crazy

TR:   Have you gotten any custom work done on your guitars besides the fender 68 you had built?

DF:  No, not really…John does a lot of my custom work on the road.  I really just buy guitars on the road.

When I lived in Laguna I used to go to The Guitar Shoppe as a kid

Photo by SUTHERLAND604

Donavon with the '68 Strat. Photo by SUTHERLAND604

Donavon's Stage Set up

Donavon's Stage Set up (Guitar in picture not part of his rig)

Pedal board Photo

Pedal board Photo

Super Sonic Amp

Fender Super Sonic Amp

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Interview with Jack Johnson

In Uncategorized on June 10, 2011 at 6:31 am
Jack's Pedal Board

Jack's Pedal Board

The Rigs: What guitarists’ sound influences you the most, both past and present, both acoustic and electric?  Feel free to name numerous players.

Jack Johnson: I started learning how to play folk songs when I started.  Cat Stevens , and Jimmy Buffett.   I was learning from my dad’s friend and you know some songs I learned cause I liked and some to learn the chords.  I also started learning when “…And Justice for All” came out and was into Kirk Hammett.  You know, “Master of Puppets” , “Ride the Lighting” and “…And Justice for All.”

When I was about 14 or 15 I was really into Hendrix and Fugazi…  And Minor Threat. My first band we did a lot of Minor Threat covers….I was also into the old soul sounds of  Steve Cropper…From my parents I was also listening to Neil Young, Hendrix and Otis Redding the old motown stuff.

The Rigs:  What musicians’ setups (guitar, pedals and amp setup) would you like to know about?

Jack Johnson:  Good Question,  I think the old Marley stuff.   I like listening to the different recordings of people who didn’t have their instrument’s they normally played on stage.  Old Marley from 72, 73 stuff is some of my favorite,  their guitar setup I would like to check out.

TR: This is a two part question, Part 1: What is the lineage of your guitar sound? In other words,  when you started playing guitar, who did your sound most resemble and how did that sound evolve to your guitar setup today? Part 2: Where do you see your sound going in the future as a guitarist?

JJ: Well I started playing electrics in punk bands, then when I was doing all the surf movies I was playing a lot of acoustic…then when I got my own studio I started playing electrics more again because it was around.

When I’m home, I’m all about the three kids.  I put the three kids to bed I find myself picking up a ukulele or acoustic guitar and you know playing very lightly

TR:  Can you list the guitars and amps you play and explain their setups?

JJ:  The Deluxe…. has more of a crunch and I like the electric for more of the soul skank… I have this Les Paul that I play thru a lot  and have an old Tele that I used.  But I was hangin out with Taj Mahal and he had a hollow body.   He said he needs to have the vibration of the guitar against his body.   You know, kind of like an acoustic.  So you can feel that vibration.  So I use hollow body Gibsons now…

I use the twin for the acoustic stuff because it’s a little bigger and can hold the acoustic. ….I put a little bit of the acoustic in my wedges…and some behind me… in the amp.

After playing a bunch of shows in Hawaii,  a bunch of charity shows, some smaller stuff, it was always wedges and I’ve gotten used to that.  I tried ears (ear monitors) for a while, then one ear but I’ve gotten back to wedges

Cole Clark makes a lot of the acoustic guitars that I play,  the austrailian guitar maker. They are my main acoustic guitars.

TR: What gauge strings do you use:

From Boogie Parlow: (Jack’s Guitar Tech): Acoustic Strings: D’Addario EJ-16, Electric Strings: D’Addario EXL 115

TR: Have you ever gotten any custom work done on your guitars?

JJ: Well Boogie lives in Hawaii now so I pretty much just drop my stuff off to him….

Jack's Guitars

Jack's Guitars

The Vault (Merlo's Basses pictured as well)- Photo by Frank Lavelle

Pedal Board (acoustic left, electric right) - Photo by Frank Lavelle

Full Set up (Start of show) - Photo by Frank Lavelle

The Amps. (Twin Left, Deluxe Right) - Photo by Frank Lavelle

Jack Johnson On stage (Hollow Body) - Photo by Brent Broza

Interview with Dan Lebowitz from ALO

In Uncategorized on May 20, 2011 at 11:02 pm

Lebo's Pedal Board - Taken 4/19/11 Updated from Pedal board pictured below.

The Rigs: What guitarists’ sound influences you the most, both past and present, both acoustic and electric? Feel free to name numerous players.

For me, it’s ever changing. Even the ones that are passing can leave a print on you that lasts forever. Some of the ones that have stuck with me are…

Dan Lebowitz: *Jimi Hendrix – Discovered him in high school, because as a guitarist, you’re supposed to love him. Honestly, I wasn’t knocked off of my feet at first. I appreciated him and liked the music, but it wasn’t until a few years later, that I saw the “Jimi plays Monterey” video and suddenly I got it. The rawness just kinda grabs your heart.

*The three Kings (B.B., Albert, and Freddie) have also been a big influence on me. Tone! Tone! Tone! I love how their guitars help to tell the stories in their songs. Often, while they are singing, they use their guitars to answer their voices. Then, when it’s time to let it rip, it’s as if they’ve released the caged animal.

*Wes Montgomery really blew my mind when I first heard him, and I’ve spent some time digging deep into his thang.

Man, I could just keep going, but a few more would be David Gilmour, Charlie Christian, Eddie Van Halen, Mississippi John Hurt, and the great saxophonist Charlie Parker. All of those players have influenced me hugely.

TR: What 2 musicians’ setups (guitar, pedals and amp setup) would you like to know about?

Lebo: Of all the rigs out there, I’d love to spend some time with the the Edge’s rig . (U2)

TR: Two part question: What is the direction of your sound as a band at present and where does your guitar sound fit into that? How do your amps, individual pedals and guitars play their roll in that sound. (be specific to the each if possible)

Lebo: I like to think of it as rootsy-adventurism. I’m super into warm analog tones, but I like to go out on a limb with them. I always use tube amps. Mostly Victoria, Goodsell, and old Fenders. I dislike playing through amps that have too much power, as I rely heavily on amp breakup for my sound. For me, an amp can’t be over 40 watts. These days I’ve been enjoying the 15 to 20 watt amps. Even on big stages. You can turn em up without blowing people’s ears out. There’s such a rich compression that happens when an amp is working hard. In short, I like the sound of a suffering amp!

TR: Where do you see your sound going in the future as a guitarist?

Lebo: I have no idea. That’s the fun part for me. I’m really open to trying new things, and I find that I’m influenced by all kinds of music, so who knows!!!

TR: What is the lineage of your guitar sound? In other words, when you started playing guitar, who did your sound most resemble and how did that sound evolve to your guitar setup today?

Lebo: When I first started playing guitar, Pete Townsend was my guy. I loved The Who. In a sense, I’m still with those types of sounds. I like to experiment a bit more these days, but when it gets down to it, a nice creamy tube amp and a comfy guitar is where it all starts for me.

TR: Could you walk me thru the signal flow of you pedal board? In other words, which pedal is wired to the next?

Lebo: This is something that I change from time to time… right now it’s sort of a long chain….

Guitar > Jangletone II (CAE) > Analog man Bi Comp > WH-1 (original whammy) > Fulltone Clyde (wah) > Home Made Overdrive > Zen Drive > Q-Tron + > Line 6 Echo Park > mini Deja Vibe > Ernie Ball Volume Pedal (500k pot).

TR: List of Guitars and Amps you play? (be as specific as possible)

Lebo: Guitars: Takamine Cedar top acoustic/electric with a sunrise pickup wired straight to the jack, Santa Cruz Vintage Jumbo Custom, Gibson L-4 CES, Gibson ES 335 , Sierra 8 string Lap Steel, Carter u12 pedal steel guitar.

Amps: Victoria 20112, Victoria Golden Melody, Goodsell 33 Custom, 1967 Fender Pro Reverb

TR: What gauge and brand of strings do you use ?

Lebo: I’ve been usin DR strings lately. I like heavy strings… 12-54

TR: Have you ever gotten any custom work done on your guitars?

Lebo: I apprenticed with a guitar builder for a couple years, and then worked as a luthier for couple years after that. I love working on guitars, but I love playing them even more. So, as I got more recording/touring opportunities, I just let the playing take over. At any rate, i do all of my own guitar work and I like to experiment with my instruments. I mess with them often.

TR: Do you have a trusted person that works on your guitars for custom work and major repairs?

Lebo: As I said before, I work on my instruments myself, but if I have a really perplexing job, I take the guitar to Keith Holland’s Guitar Hospital in Los Gatos, California. Keith is the master luthier I apprenticed with. He does amazing work…. A real artisan.

Lebo in Soundcheck 10/13/10

Lebo's Victoria Golden Melody with speaker controls wired in between head and speakers

Lebo's Goodsell 33 Custom

Lebos' Pedal Board

Lebo's Pedal Board - Taken 10/13/10

 

Dan Lebowitz with Gibson SG

Interview with Chuck Fay from State Radio

In Uncategorized on August 11, 2010 at 1:57 am

The Rigs: What guitarists’ and/or bassists sound influences you the most, both past and present; acoustic guitar, upright bass, electric bass and guitar?  Feel free to name numerous players.

Chuck Fay: Wowsers… so many great sounds. Here we go! Jimi Hendrix & Billy Cox/Noel Redding, Jimi Page & John Paul Jones, Tony Iommi & Geezer Butler, Jonny & Colin Greenwood, Tom Morello and Tim Commerford, Paul McCartney, James Jamerson, Neil Young, Les Claypool, Michael Henderson, Mark Sandman, Jack White, Elliott Smith, Chris Wood, Dave Holland, Jesse Keeler, Bootsy Collins, Mark Knopfler, Aston “Family Man” Barrett, Robbie Shakespeare, Ernest Ranglin, Bernard Odum, Vernon Reid & Muzz Skillings, Liam Finn, Marc Ribot, Brad Jones, Paul Chambers, Paul D’Amour, Justin Meldal-Johnsen etc…

TR: What 2 musicians’ setups (guitar and/or bass, pedals and amp setup) would you like to know about?

CF: I really dig the sounds Chris Wood gets both live and in the studio.  State Radio was lucky enough to play a show with them recently so I got to pick his brain a bit.   Jesse Keeler got absurdly huge sounds with Death From Above 1979.  It’d be fun to check out where those 4000 lb sounds came from…

TR: Three part question: What is the direction of your sound as a band at present and where does your bass sound fit into that? How do your amps, individual pedals and guitars play their roll in that sound.  (be specific to the each if possible)

CF: I think State Radio’s sound will continue to be a hodgepodge of junk rock, roots reggae, ska, punk, and whatever other random crap gets slapped on.  Lucky for me, this variety of styles and the space inherent to a trio affords the bassist much room to freak out da’ box.

I can get really aggressive with distortion using my Fulltone Bass Drive and Crowther Hot Cake. I can go up an octave with my Whammy IV, roll off the neck pickup on either my ’78 Fender Jazz or EBO copy and pretend I’m a lead guitar player.  There’s also room for really gnarley octave distortion using either my EHX Micro Synth or the Whammy coupled with one of the previous distortion boxes.  Or all of ’em at the same time! 11!  I’ll also use the Whammy for getting synthy dub bass sounds with the octave down setting.

TR: Where do you see your sound going in the future as a bassist?

CF: Well, I finally put together enough scratch to acquire an upright, so i’m going to try and incorporate that into the bag. I’ve been working on a score for my wife’s documentary “A Fine State This Is” and that has called for some arco work which is really fun.

One of these days, I’m going to get a little combo guitar amp and an A/B switch for my live setup so I can dedicate individual amps to both bass and guitar textures.

TR: What is the lineage of your bass sound? In other words,  when you started playing bass, who did your sound most resemble and how did that sound evolve to your bass setup today?

CF: When I started playing bass I got way into Primus and RATM as influences from the funky, heavy and (Les Claypool)weird world.  My playing had a lot more slap/pop and hi-fi elements to it. Then there was early 70’s fusion stuff, specifically Dark Magus which was a HUGE record for me.  So heavy and dark and ill and funky!  That’s when I became a Michael Henderson fan and started to get into the non-repetitive (yet ryhthmic) elements of his playing on those recordings.  The sounds were more lo-fi with Michael’s big round motown stylings.

As the years go by and you hear so much music and so many different styles, I think you just try to incorporate whatever resonates with you into your own means of expression.  I’ve been lucky enough to play and record with some great musicians/producers who know how to draw from all these different worlds.  I think now you’ll still hear all those sounds that I was into when I started playing, plus different elements like the synth stuff and reggae stuff which have become part of what I do over the years.

TR: List of basses and Amps you play?

CF:  Live, I play either my ’78 Fender Jazz, 70’s Hondo P-Bass copy or 70’s unknown (possibly Fernandes) Japanese EB-O copy through an Ampeg SVT-350 with an Acoustic 8×10.  The EBO copy has a microphonic bridge pickup which is great for feedback/lead guitar stuff.  I actually just busted the Hondo up a bit at a show in Boston (with the help of State Radio’s drummer MIke “Mad Dawg” Najarian) so she needs a new neck and some body work.  I was throwing the bass to my tech who is invisible and doesn’t exist.

I also HAD a really nice Ken Smith 5 string fretless that has suddenly gone missing.  All those who steal musical instruments should get a really hot poker in the eye and genitals…    In the studio, I’ve been lucky enuf to play some great basses (’58 P-Bass, an old Hofner Violin Bass, a couple old Rickenbackers) through some great amps (mostly B-15’s) and great DI’s.  I know direct boxes aren’t very sexy but some of the best sounds I’ve gotten in the studio have been with (producer) Tchad Blake and we used direct injection exclusively.

TR: What winding style, gauge and brand of strings do you use ?

CF:  I use Ernie Ball’s, usually Hybrid Slinky’s which gauge out to .045 .065 .085 .105

TR: Have you ever gotten any custom work done on your bass?

CF:  I’ve installed a G&L MFD pickup on my Hondo, wiring the pickup directly to the output jack.  I also put a neck pickup in my EBO copy.  It’s just some generic Chinese humbucking pickup I found online.  As I mentioned previously, it looks like the next project is a new neck and some body work on the Hondo.  Damn it.

TR: Do you have a trusted person that works on your basses for custom work and major repairs?

CF: Me!

———————————–

You can check out Chuck and State Radio’s music and upcoming tour at www.stateradio.com

Chuck's Basses (Ken Smith pictured is the fretted version on Chuck's fretless Ken Smith)

Chuck's Pedal Board

Chuck's Setup (The small roadcase in center is not part of Chuck's Rig)

Chuck in Boston. Bank of American Pav.

G.Love Interview and Rig

In Uncategorized on June 1, 2010 at 10:50 pm

The Rigs: What guitarists’ sound influences you the most, both past and present, both acoustic and electric?  Feel free to name numerous players.

G.Love: My number one influence is blues legend John Hammond. His rhythmic, driving sound is like a hurricane or a freight train coming at ya and the first time I saw his explosive solo acoustic performance I realized that one man and a guitar didn’t have to be “singer-songwriter” strumming. Emulating his style taught me to play lead and rhythm all at once.
I’m heavily influenced by many Delta Blues players like- Fred Mcdowell, John Hurt, Robert Johnson, Bukka White and Big Bill Broonzy,  also Texas Bluesman Lightening Hopkins… and John Lee Hooker have been two huge electric blues influences. John Lee Hooker especially…  Then of course, the great chicago players like Freddie King, Albert Collins, Albert King,

Oh yeah – Clapton and Hendrix…. A million more

The Rigs: What 2 musicians’ setups (guitar, pedals and amp setup) would you like to know about?

G.Love: Most of the players that have influenced me are old blues players who just used an acoustic or a guitar plugged straight in to an old tube amp. I’ve never been so into electronics. Gradually, over the years with the help of my guitar techs, I’ve expanded my pedal board and sound palette.
Two of my peers whose rigs sound amazing are Ben Harper and John Butler. I love what these guys do and they really have their shit together…

TR:  What is the direction of your sound as a band, today, and where does your guitar sound fit into that?

G:  I like to think of us a low fi garage band. No matter how hard we try to be tight and polished, we always sound loose and sloppy in a beautiful way. I think that’s what our sound is all about. I believe we are all truly accomplished and original players and the charm of what we do lies in that lo fi, funky sloppy shit we do out there every night.
My guitars sound lo fi, my voice does too. Nothings perfect. My pedal board is designed to change up my vibe for my solos. I use a blues distortion pedal and a Q-Tron for soloing power. I’ve always used a tremelo/vibrato pedal since the beginning when it was part of my 60’s Ampeg Rocket Reverb amp.
So my sound is not all together smooth- although it can be… and definitely, I favor the sound of the guitar straight into the amp with a small gain boost- its just the sound of a cool guitar into a cool amp. Simple as can be.

TR:  Where do you see your sound going in the future, as a guitarist?

G:   I see myself going back to my acoustic roots this year. I’m honestly at my best with an acoustic guitar so I see myself simplifying my whole approach even more.
For my electric playing, I see myself continuing with my current rig as a mainstay and swapping a few pedals here and there.

TR: What is the lineage of your guitar sound? In other words,  when you started playing guitar, who did your sound most resemble and how did that sound evolve to your guitar setup today?

G:  As I said earlier, I was trying to cop John Hammonds vibe and the vibe of bluesmen like John Lee Hooker- the real raw shit. It was simple, plug in, turn it up till the tubes start driving and you get a bit of natural crunch and let it rip.

TR:  List of Guitars you play?

G:  I’ve been greatly honored to team up with Gretsch a couple years back and I have released my “Meanie Greenie” G.love Corvette. Its a reissue of the classic 60’s model Corvette. Killer Diller- check it out!
I also lean on an old pawn shop guitar “the Elite” by Crucianelli. I’m pretty sure its an offshoot of the Italian brand Eko from the 60’s. Nothing sounds like it and I’ve been recording with it for 18 years…
Then my quiver is pretty ill these days.

Gretsch 60th anniversary hollow body
Gretsch Penquin
Gretsch Black Falcon
Black corvette
70 black Les Paul
1998? Custom shop one of a kind cream Les Paul
Harmony
53 gretsch electromatic vanilla chocolate
66 Fendar Jaguar
2000 custom shop Philadelphonic inlay Gibson fire bird
1998 gibson 125
60s white Eko

(What else…)

For Acoustics:
Gretsch custom shop Dreadnought with Tabacco sunburst
1939 wooden Dobro
1999 National tri-cone resonaphonic dobro
2 Gibson j-45s
Gibson 185
Gibson 185 12 string
2 Gretsch White Falcon acoustics
Gretsch Rancher

(What else…)

TR:  What gauge strings do you use and what type of strings (d’addario, fender)?

G:  I have always used D’Addario 13’s on my acoustic guitars
I now use D’addario 12s on my electrics.

TR: Have you ever gotten any custom work done on your guitars?

G:  The designing and the development of the G.love Gretsch Corvette was just that. We started with an old design and remodeled it with all custom pickups wood and hardware.
I also used to work with this cat WashTub Robbie in Boston who made me a YoBro- it was an old acoustic guitar that he made into an electric dobro. That was pretty dope.

TR:  Do you have a trusted person that works on your guitars for custom work and major repairs?

G:  In Philly we take our guitars to Rich Chodak At Blue Bond guitars off of South St. He does great work and has saved my ass more than once.
In Boston I work with a cat named Gabriel Vianni. Gabe works with First Act guitars in the corporate office but he still does me solid and does excellant repairs. I’m kind of tough on these pieces of wood and metal…
On the road my guitar tech extraordinaire- The Big Skrimp – Frank Caraccia works on the guitars and keeps them humming and ready for the stage and studio.

————

You can check out G.Love’s music and upcoming tour dates at www.philadelphonic.com

G.Love Guitars

G.Love Acoustic Setup

Pictured with Dunlop Bass Ball. Emma DiscBOBulator has since replaced the Dunlop Bass Ball. Pedal Board wired and constructed by Frank Caraccia

G.Love Full Setup

Interview with Michael Hannigan from My Antenna

In Uncategorized on January 12, 2010 at 8:34 pm

Michael Hannigan from My Antenna Pedal Board

The Rigs: Who’s guitar sound was most influential on you; both past and present, electric and acoustic?

Michael Hannigan:  For Electric I’d say:  John Lee Hooker, John Scofield (A Go Go) David Bowie,  (especially in Rebel, Rebel), Neil Yong, Drug Rug’s self titled album, Dan Auerbach, Grizzly Bear (they have some great chord voicings) , Jack White, Kurt Cobain, Marc Ribot, Jimmy Page, The Beatles (like in “Dig a pony”), Tom Morello, Tom Petty, Tom Waits, Yeah, Yeah, Yeahs (Fever to Tell), The Band
For Acoustic: Leadbelly, Chris Whitley, Fiest, The Band again, The Beatles (Two of US), Bon Iver, Johnny Cash, Neil Young, Son House, Ray LaMontagne, Robert Johnson, Ruben Gonzalez, Tom Waits and Bob Dylan.  I know there are a bunch more that I can’t think of right now.

Recently I’ve been getting back into some Cuban traditional and just started getting into Baltic roots music, by way of Beirut.  There sound is so beautifully melodic and rough together.

TR: Which 2 peoples setups would you like to know about?

MH: Robert Johnson’s recording set up.  I feel like that is a mysterious session that I would have loved to be a fly one the wall of that hotel room.

And Jack White, he pushes the music out of himself through the guitar

TR: Which guitarist has influenced you the most as a player, apart from that players sound?

MH:  Marc Ribot.  The notes he chooses to play over all these different chord structures are very unique, plus his sound is so raw and melodic.

TR: What is the direction of your sound as a band, at present, and where does your guitar sound fit into that?

MH: Right now it is centered on rock and roll, garage, and blues with an extra set of balls.  Occasionally an Americana/ Tom petty, Neil young influence.  I still try to dabble in the punk sound.  I’m still diving into that genre, picking up as much as I can.  Also every once and a while it’s nice to just shut it all off and remember where music started, without electricity.

I try not to make the guitar the center but since I’ve been writing on guitar it tends to lean in that direction.  Then with melody; it’s a part, separate and the most important thing, all at the same time.

TR: Where do you see your sound going in the future, as a guitarist?

MH: I plan on polarizing the music a bit.  Focusing on a more small acoustic string ensemble orientation. Also fusing that feel over a full electric band.  And then leaning to the opposite side, to a more deeper distorted electric sound.  Sometimes touching on an undistorted electric sound here and there.

TR: What is the lineage of the sound you have today?

MH:I started with a jam band setup and direction but sometimes in some jam bands, the quality of music is sacrificed in order to facilitate a vehicle to arrive at the opportunity to solo; although, there are some amazing jam bands out there. I stopped playing in a band for a bit and tried to write with no ensemble set ups in mind and just go where each song was telling me to go.  Then I think I tried to synthesize all that into the sound of the band today, then I tried to tailor my guitar sound from a perspective as to what serves each song.

TR: List of Guitars you play?

MH: a 90’s Gibson 135,  a 90’s Epi Les Paul,  60’s Hagstrom,  Luthier Classical, and Yamaha acoustic.  I don’t remember the years on any of them.

TR: What gauge and brand of strings do you use and what material are your strings made of?

MH: 11 gauge, D’Addario’s, nickel

TR: Have you ever gotten any custom work done on your guitars?

MH:  I customized my Hagstrom with two separate output and pickup systems.  I’m still tweaking that idea a bit to get a cleaner tone and choice of each string.  I am in the process of designing some specific pick-ups for that idea.

TR: A trusted Luthier?

MH: Me, right now but I’m looking for a trained professional who really knows what they are doing.

———–

You can check out Michael Hannigan and My Antenna at www.myantennamusic.com

Mike from My Antenna playing a borrowed White Les Paul

Welcome to ‘The Rigs’

In Uncategorized on July 7, 2009 at 11:07 pm

Welcome to ‘The Rigs’, a blog about the amp,guitar and pedal board configurations of players from all different musical genres.  On each of blog entry we will sit down with an artist and talk about their guitars, pedal boards, and amp configurations they use at each of their shows along with the wiring of the whole rig.  We will also touch on the growth of their sound and what guitar sounds the artist is into right now.  In addition, we will also sit down with the artist’s guitar tech and talk over physical construction, maintenance and all the odds and ends in dealing with guitar configurations on a day to day basis.   If you have an artist that you would like us to interview just click on the email link below.  Feel free to send us a link to the artist’s website and/ or myspace page.   Feel free to check in and check out new entries over soon.

Quarter inch open

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